Module 7: All About Tags, Search, and Editing Additional Questions

<< Back to Module 6

Forward to Core Certification Exam >>


In this Module:

  • Tags and the Tags Manager
  • Searching and filtering the Dashboard
  • Editing Additional Questions
Prefer to read along?

Enable captions by clicking the “CC” button along the YouTube timeline or read the full transcript below.

Back to top


Module 7 practice quiz

Back to top


Show Notes № 7

Back to top


Quiz answers

Back to top


Video transcript

If you wish to follow along with the script, or just prefer reading, a complete transcript of the Module 6 video can be seen below.

Welcome to the last video in the Core training series. This is Ellie with the Customer Concierge team.
Before we part company, there are a few things we need to zip up and pack away. Simply put, this is our miscellaneous module where we’ve stowed a few tips and tricks that we couldn’t find spots for in our previous videos, including tips for Tags, Additional Questions, and Search syntax and lemmatization. (We know. It’s crazy to leave lemmatization right to the very end, but there it is!)
Have you ever seen a brand new railroad car on your local line? Hardly anyone ever has. When they leave the factory they are ready to do the job they were designed for. They are shiny and neat—for the moment at least.
But go train spotting and the first thing you’ll notice is the graffiti tagged all over the railcars.
Tags are the proverbial graffiti at the bottom of your Comment tiles. They are sprayed on well after the results come rumbling in. Tagging can mark up your comments with any category you can imagine. Tags don't even need to conform to any of the words or ideas expressed in the comments! So, like graffiti, they often appear haphazard and look like the secret codes known only to the taggers. (In a minute, we’ll show you how to clean things up.)
Tags seem to show up everywhere. Click the timestamp on a Comment tile and zip, you're off to the "Permalink" page where you can see all of the tags associated with a response on the sidebar to the right. You can also add tags from this panel. 
(...Did you notice that all the answers to Additional Questions also appear on the Permalink page? You can even view and edit all of the predefined properties right here too, if you wish…) 
But I digress. 
Let’s locate more tags by clicking on someone's name and opening their "Response History" page. You’ll find tags here as well—just look at the "Feedback" section. It’s a copy of the Comment tile from the Dashboard and displays all of the attached tags. (Tags seem to stick to everything!)
Okay. Let’s circle back to the Dashboard and add, as well as delete, a few Tags in a typical Comment tile. Just: 
1. Click “Add a tag”
2. Pick from the list of existing tags, or type in a new keyword (like “quality,” “size,” or “whatever you want”)
3. Press “Enter” to attach the new Tag to the Comment tile
4. Continue adding as many Tags as you wish [and, you can]
5. Remove Tags by hovering over a Tag and clicking its red X. (Remember, this only removes the tag from your specific comment. Other responses will still have their tags.) 
And now for a few tips and tricks. Tag Tip #1: Filter and be creative!
Tags don’t need to match any of the words in a comment. You can use them creatively. To demonstrate, we're going to tag "Please Reach Out!" on CSAT Comments that are strong candidates for, well, someone reaching out with a solution.
But do you see our dilemma? There are over 5,000 records! (That's way too many to sift through.) Let's isolate the issues by filtering only records “With comments.” This drops the responses down below 200. Then, we'll pin only the “Dissatisfied records,” which just leaves a few dozen Comment tiles to consider tagging. (Now that's a manageable number.)
Tag Tip 2: Searching with syntax
Search is helpful in so many ways. You can use it to create Trends, pinpointing specific issues, and narrow down the list of comments to be tagged, as we’ll do here. 
For example, let’s experiment with search to find out if free shipping is an important thing to Hem & Stitch customers. 
We’ll start by entering multiple words, both free and shipping, into the search window and simply watch what happens. Notice anything peculiar? 
There are several issues right away:
Notice that entering “free” and “shipping” identifies records containing either “free” AND/OR “shipping,” (which is unfocused and not what we are after). 
Another issue is created by lemmatization, which identifies inflected words based on their roots. In our case, the word “shipping” also finds “shipped” as in [Owen’s] record here, and it will also identify “ship" and "ships." (Lemmatization is normally quite helpful, but in this case it adds records that are well off our mark.)
The final thing is that the word “free” is used in a lot of different ways and not always in the context of free shipping as a savings to the customer. 
So let's adjust our syntax. The correct syntax for a specific phrase is to treat it as a quote: such as [open quote]“free shipping"[close quote]. This simple change brings up records where the words appear together, side-by-side. (Now that’s more like it.)
Here’s another trick worth mentioning: Use the “-” symbol preceding any word to filter out responses that include a keyword, such as minus free. Let’s see what happens…
With this small change, the comments seem to address the pace of shipping and not the additional costs to Hem & Stitch customers. Refining a search query with these tricks can better synthesize, and frankly clean up, both your Tags as well as your Trends.
Tag Tip #3: Use the Tag Manager to clean things up!
Speaking of cleaning things up—the very “graffiti-like” nature of tagging means that they multiply quickly and can create an unruly mess. Anyone can create them. 
To edit all of the Tags created by you and all of your team members, click the Tag manager’s “Gear” icon in the bottom-right corner of any Comment tile. This will open the Tag manager page. Once here you can:
Delete a tag, like the word “soft” (Which doesn’t seem to be contributing much insight to this project.) Merge tags, like “value” with “values.” (It makes sense to combine these two.) And rename a tag, such as “mobile” to “Mobile App” (Which makes the tag a bit more precise.)
Importantly, changes made in your Tag Manager are global. When you delete, merge, or rename tags on this page, all of the associated tags on every Comment tile, corresponding Response History and Permalink page changes as well. And it applies to every user in the project. 
Now that we’ve cleaned up tags, let’s do the same for Additional Questions. 
In this last section we’ll throw in a few helpful tips around Additional Questions, which we couldn’t fit into our ‘side trip’ in Core Module 2. As you remember, Additional Questions is a premium feature enabling between 1 and 10 supplemental questions to be appended to a survey platform. 
Additional questions are presented immediately following the initial scale point selection and comment questions. You can choose to add questions using these very familiar question types: Free response, Scale, Select one option from a list, and Select many options from a list.
Two other Additional Questions types work together and warrant a tad more explanation:
Email: The Email question type captures (or updates) a respondent’s email address, which helps convert anonymous respondents (from Link, Kiosk, or Web platforms) into potential Email panel members
Name: As the “Name” suggests, this question captures (or updates) a respondent’s name, which is an important property to gather if you wish to convert … say anonymous “Person (12345678910)” … into an actual person
One quick note: Delighted does not provide a “force response” option to compel someone to answer any of the additional questions before moving onto the next. 
To view all six additional question types:
1. Click the “Survey People” button
2. Click on the “Gear” icon 
3. Select “Configure additional questions”
4. Open the question type selection menu 
And with that, here's the promised tips and tricks which should resolve any “additional questions” that have not yet been answered. 
Tip 1: Set up each platform separately
Additional questions are appended to specific distribution platforms. Since each platform hosts its own list, Additional Questions added to the Link platform will NOT appear in Email sends and vice versa.
Linking Additional Questions to platforms allows you to make modifications based on each platform's uniqueness. For example, the question, “How easy was it to navigate our Website?” may not apply to Email respondents. 
Tip 2: Applying edits to your questions
To edit any question:
Click the Gear icon on any active platform to access the Additional Questions configuration page for that platform
Click in the question box to edit or rewrite the text
To rewrite an answer choice:
Delete the obsolete answer by clicking its red x, (which zaps the option from the list) 
Subsequently, add your new choices! (Simple as that.)
Tip 3: Think about using the “Other” option
Sometimes someone's answer may not align with the choices you’ve entered into your options. Consider opening things up by adding the “Other” option to the end of your list. This allows a text response alternative, which is bound to give you some unforeseen insights.
Tip 4: Randomize questions and answers
Randomize your multiple choice questions with the “Randomize” option. This technique reduces the effects of first choice answer bias. (Which is a real thing when respondents are in a hurry.)
You can also randomize all of your Additional Questions so each person views your questions in a different order. In high-volume surveys, the technique can help reduce the effects of the dreaded drop-out rate, where later questions are skipped when people leave midway through the survey. (This is also a thing, so minimize the impact by going random and keeping your survey short!) 
Tip 5: Filter questions by Scale group
You can decide who receives certain questions based upon their choice in the initial score group. This is powerful.  For example, with CSAT, you can choose between your Satisfied, Neutral, and Dissatisfied participants when assigning Additional Questions. Just click “Who should see this question” and pick the appropriate scale group. 
Later, you can also filter your Additional Questions using these same filters. (That’s a handy trick.)
Tip 6: Click “Save Question” and “Publish” often!
If you enter or edit a question, and (accidently or on purpose) click out to another part of Delighted before saving, the question will vanish. It’s gone! Ouch. (Does this sound like a lamentable personal experience?) To avoid this mishap, click Save question as you finish up. 
But there is one more step you’ll need to take. After editing and saving your list of questions, you must also hit the Publish button to take all of your edits live to your recipients. Otherwise, your old, sad, mistake-filled questions will linger on and on. 
The Publish command prevents new questions from going live prematurely, so this extra step is probably a good thing. 
Scene 3: Outro
So there you go! That’s our training all zipped up and packed away.
It was a pleasure bringing you our Core certification series. View more instructional videos in our Help Center or watch them on our Youtube channel. (There’s a link in the Show Notes.)
If you would like to explore the next level, we have an Admin Certification course that makes a great follow-up to this Core training. 
I hope you enjoy Delighted—and thanks for spending your valuable time with us!

Back to top


<< Back to Module 6

Forward to Core Certification Exam >>

Still need help? Contact Us Contact Us